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What Children & Adolescents Need to Feel Loved

What Children & Adolescents Need to Feel Loved by Dr. Munn Saechao, child & adolescent psychotherapist in Mountain View, CA and online therapist for professional women of color.

Children and adolescents experience love when we create clear, consistent and concise boundaries for them. In fact, children and adolescents need these boundaries in order to develop self-control and a moral compass.

Predicability allows children and adolescents to feel safe. When children experience safety, this allows them to express curiosities, explore their interests and talents, show vulnerabilities and learn from mistakes, thus allowing them to develop into healthy adults. 

High yet reasonable expectations accompanied with access to resources allow children and adolescents to be challenged, and develop perseverance, motivation, and agency, which are internal tools necessary for children to reach their full potential.

Remember, we show love to our children when we give them what they need, and that is boundaries, predictability, and setting high yet reasonable expectations for them.

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Disclaimer: The content in this post is only intended to increase your knowledge on parenting and child development; it is not online therapy. If you’re concerned about your child’s immediate safety please call 911 and consult with a licensed clinician about any clinical symptoms you are observing in your child.

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Free Parenting Workshop

Hi parents and caregivers, if you’re located in the eastbay or surrounding area, here is your chance to participate in a FREE four week parenting workshop where you will gain knowledge and learn practical skills to improve limit setting and boundary setting/holding! Space is limited and filling up. You won’t want to miss out on this rare opportunity! Register ASAP by emailing training@westcoastcc.org

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When your child says “people are either dumb or smart.”

When your child says “people are either dumb or smart” by Dr. Munn Saechao, online therapist and coach for professional women of color and child and adolescent psychotherapist in Mountain View, CA.

Most young children will develop a fixed mindset unless they grow up in homes and environments that foster and reinforce a growth mindset.

Let’s say your child comes home from school one day and states, “people are either dumb or smart,” or you either “know or don’t.” If your child continues to hold the ideology that “people are either dumb or smart,” once you’ve explained that ability is developed through learning and practice, it’s important therefore to “model” a growth mindset.

What do I mean by modeling? While at the dinner table for example, discuss your day, including set backs, challenges, strategies, what worked and didn’t work, what you learned, ways to improve, etc. You’ll be amazed at your children’s engagement and mirroring effect on your behaviors. As their primary role model, you are henceforth normalizing perseverance, openness, and learning. You’re sending the message that it’s okay to be challenged and make mistakes. In fact, these setbacks and frustrations are teachable learning moments to improve, develop, and grow.

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Webpage: drmunn.com
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Email: dr.munn.saechao@gmail.com

Disclaimer: The content in this post is only intended to increase your knowledge on parenting and child development; it is not online therapy. If you’re concerned about your child’s immediate safety please call 911 and consult with a licensed clinician about any clinical symptoms you are observing in your child.

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I’m Dr. Munn…

I’m Dr. Munn, online therapist and coach for professional women, and child & adolescent psychotherapist in Mountain View, CA

I enjoy working with diverse populations and specialize in treating anxiety, depression, ADHD and high functioning autism.

I am very passionate about working with professional women to foster their growth mindset, increase self-compassion, and develop coping skills to manage the stressors of living in a highly pressured and demanding environment, given the sociocultural political climate.

Additionally, I am extremely passionate about working with children and adolescents to increase mindfulness, distress tolerance, coping strategies, and executive functioning skills to foster emotional regulation, interpersonal effectiveness, and adaptive functioning.

After working in the mental health field for 11 years, I have found that it’s quite common for individuals to have a dual diagnosis, such as a neurodevelopmental disorder, accompanied with anxiety and/or mood disorder. Thus, the patients, families, and adults I work with present with complex symptoms and require a unique and culturally sensitive treatment approach to improve overall functioning.

In all, the work of being a psychotherapist is intricate, challenging, interesting, and very rewarding. I am truly humbled at the opportunity to connect with so many unique and gifted individuals and families, and feel privileged to do what I love, which is to help individuals and families to strengthen, heal, and transform.

If you’re located in Silicon Valley, identify as a professional woman, or you’re a parent with a child suffering from anxiety, depression, ADHD and/or high functioning autism, please feel free to email or call me and together let’s see how we could work together to reach your goals.

Webpage: drmunn.com
Email: dr.munn.saechao@gmail.com

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Questions to foster a growth mindset in children and adolescents

Questions to foster a growth mindset in children and adolescents by Dr. Munn Saechao, online therapist for professional women of color and child and adolescent psychotherapist in Mountain View, CA

A fixed mindset fosters self-doubt, insecurities, and fear of failure. A growth mindset fosters self-esteem, confidence, and endurance.

Reinforcement of a growth mindset is critical during adolescence because of the natural challenges that come from this stage of development. While there are statements we can make to foster a growth mindset, there are also questions we can ask to promote a growth mindset. What’s important is that these statements and questions allow our children to attune to their learning process.

When children and adolescents become aware of what helps/doesn’t help them learn, they become more empowered to initiate and tackle tasks independently.

We can help our children & adolescents to become more mindful of barriers and supports to learning. Once they develop a growth mindset, more likely than not, they will lean into challenge.

Did you find this post helpful? Then follow my page to get free parenting tips & mental health information.⠀

Lastly, feel free to peruse through my social media profiles to learn more.

Webpage: drmunn.com
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.munn/
Facebook: http://facebook.com/counselingwithdrmunn/
LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/in/drmunn
Email: dr.munn.saechao@gmail.com

Disclaimer: The content in this post is only intended to increase your knowledge on parenting and child development; it is not online therapy. If you’re concerned about your child’s immediate safety please call 911 and consult with a licensed clinician about any clinical symptoms you are observing in your child.

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The Frustrations of Learning

The frustrations of Learning by Dr. Munn, online psychotherapist for professional women of color and child and adolescent psychotherapist in Mountain View, CA

As much training and education I’ve received over the course of my career, I still get very frustrated when I don’t know how to do something and when something is really hard for me. I especially get frustrated when I’m not progressing at my “ideal” rate, particularly given the intense amount of effort, time and finances invested. I’m proud though of my “growth mindset,” which has gotten me very far in life. Even though something might feel novel and difficult, I have internalized the belief that I can learn.

I remember telling a friend at the age of 17, I’m not smart; I have average intelligence; I just work really hard. His response was, “Munn, working hard is a sign of intelligence.” That caused me to reflect on my ideas about intelligence and ability and where they emerged from, which is not surprising given the line of work I landed in. I share this to emphasize that most of us (not speaking specifically to the bottom 2-3% or the top 1-2% on a normal curve) have to work hard to develop mastery, which includes but not limited to sacrifice, sleepless nights, tears, and feelings of frustration, loneliness, and momentary desires to quit.

This week I completed a psychodiagnostic report in 16 hours which would have taken 2x longer 1.5 years ago and 3x longer 3 years ago. This shows me that I can learn something very challenging with much time, effort, help, dedication, patience, and perseverance. The truth is, we all can learn, including you and your children, even with special needs. So stay encouraged and keep moving forward.

Have you experienced something similar? Please share.

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Lastly, feel free to peruse through my social media profiles to learn more.

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Disclaimer: The content in this post is only intended to increase your knowledge on parenting and child development; it is not online therapy. If you’re concerned about your child’s immediate safety please call 911 and consult with a licensed clinician about any clinical symptoms you are observing in your child.

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Impact of Negative Stereotypes on Children’s Performance

Impact of Negative Stereotypes on Children’s Performance by Dr. Munn, online psychotherapist for professional women of color and child and adolescent psychotherapist in Mountain View, CA.

Research shows when negative stereotypes (gender) are evoked prior to a math exam, females perform poorer than their male counterparts. If negative stereotypes are not evoked prior to taking the exam, they perform comparable. Why is this the case? When negative stereotypes are evoked, it causes a distraction and illicit insecurities at a subconscious level, therefore preventing them from fully focusing and attending to the task at hand.

Thus, if you’re a parent with a little girl, it’s crucial to (1) foster their self-esteem, (2) instill a growth mindset by teaching them to focus on learning rather than ability, (3) expose them to challenging situations that are also male dominated to cultivate perseverance and self-efficacy, (4) and remind them continually to focus on the goal (e.g. doing their best), even when it feels hard. Of note, these concepts are applicable to women and girls of all ages.

Wondering what growth mindset is? Check out my previous posts to learn more.

Did you find this post helpful? Then follow my page to get free parenting tips and information about mental health.

Lastly, feel free to peruse through my social media profiles to learn more.

Webpage: drmunn.com
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.munn/
Facebook: http://facebook.com/counselingwithdrmunn/
LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/in/drmunn
Email: dr.munn.saechao@gmail.com

Reference: Good, C., Rattan, A., & Dweck, C. S. (2012). Why do women opt out? Sense of belonging and women’s representation in mathematics. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 102(4), 700-717.

Disclaimer: The content in this post is only intended to increase your knowledge on parenting and child development; it is not online therapy. If you’re concerned about your child’s immediate safety please call 911 and consult with a licensed clinician about any clinical symptoms you are observing in your child.

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Cooking as Self-Care

Cooking as Self-Care by Dr. Munn Saechao, Online Therapist for Professional Women of Color and Child & Adolescent Psychotherapist in Mountain View, CA.

Self-care is such a big part of my life. I teach it and I live it and continually am learning new ways to engage in self-care activities that nourish my mind, body and spirit.

I don’t have as much time to do this but when I do, one of the things I enjoy doing is cooking, especially cooking for others. There is something about cooking that I find so meditative and there is also something about sharing a meal and observing others enjoy what I’ve created that is deeply rewarding. At times I’ll forgo eating because of the satisfaction I experience when witnessing how a good home cooked meal can make others so happy; this is especially true for loved ones.

I love cooking with simple ingredients and love color and presentation! Cleaning may not be fun but the process of cooking is, at least for me that is.

On that note, what do you enjoy cooking?

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Email: dr.munn.saechao@gmail.com

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Growth Mindset in Early Adolescence

Growth Mindset in Early Adolescence by Dr. Munn Saechao, Online Therapist for Professional Women of Color and Child & Adolescent Psychotherapist in Mountain View, CA.

It’s incredible to me how we as human beings are able to influence each other. Particularly if you’re a parent, you have significant influence over your child’s mindset. When children enter into early adolescence, academics become more challenging, they have to adjust to a new academic structure, and there is less individual attention paid to each child’s learning needs and strengths, not to mention the added hormones and growing bodies to say the least. Peer comparisons become preoccupying, insecurities are more present, moodiness is more of a norm, and self-doubt can often get in the way of learning and academic achievement. Thus, it’s important to focus your attention and put in extra effort to foster your child’s growth mindset, which is the belief that one can persevere and learn when faced with obstacles. The good news is, we can do something right now by acknowledging and focusing on our children’s strengths, effort, and progress, and help them develop skills necessary to navigate future life challenges.

Did you find this post helpful? Then like/follow/subscribe to my page to get free parenting tips and information about mental health.

Lastly, feel free to peruse through my social media profiles to learn more.

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.munn/
Facebook: http://facebook.com/counselingwithdrmunn/
LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/in/drmunn
Webpage: drmunn.com
Email: dr.munn.saechao@gmail.com

Disclaimer: The content in this post is only intended to increase your knowledge on parenting and child development; it is not online therapy. If you are concerned about your child’s immediate safety please call 911 and consult with a licensed clinician about any clinical symptoms you are observing in your child

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Self-care, we talk about it all the time, but what exactly is it?

Self-care, we talk about it all the time, but what exactly is it? by Dr. Munn Saechao, Online Therapist for Professional Women of Color and Child & Adolescent Psychotherapist in Mountain View, CA.

One of the things I enjoy teaching and talking about is self-care and how to help parents, professionals, and mental health providers to develop a healthier understanding and application of self-care.

I’ve been studying psychology and social work for 15 years and have worked in the mental health field for 11 years and I’m still trying to figure out how to live a life centered around “self-care.” It would be nice if all my meals were balanced and healthy, I practiced daily meditation and exercised for 30-60 minutes, I slept 8 hours a night and consumed 64 ounces of water a day. These self-care activities all sound good but they’re not practical, not in my life at least. Particularly when we are inundated with external demands, social expectations, and have student loans to pay off to say the least, it’s quite easy to allow “self-care” to fall to the wayside.

I’ve come to learn overtime that self-care is about acknowledging where I’m at and being kind to myself. While we all can develop healthier habits, which would behoove us in general, what’s most important is having a healthy relationship with oneself by tuning into our emotions, thoughts, and behaviors, and responding to those innermost needs. While running is a significant part of my life, I’m not always able to run 60 minutes a day, sometimes it’s only 20 minutes a day because it’s all I can do given my daily agenda. My inner critic then tells me, “Why didn’t you run 30 minutes?” My rational mind responds with, “20 minutes is better than nothing; at least I got a run in.” If you walk away with something from this post, I hope it’s around shifting the meaning of self-care, and that is, being more self-compassionate. I encourage you today to be kind to yourself.

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Lastly, feel free to peruse through my social media profiles to learn more.

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.munn/
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LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/in/drmunn
Webpage: drmunn.com 
Email: dr.munn.saechao@gmail.com

Disclaimer: The content in this post is only intended to increase your knowledge on parenting and child development; it is not online therapy. If you’re concerned about your child’s immediate safety please call 911 and consult with a licensed clinician about any clinical symptoms you are observing in your child

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How to promote a growth mindset in children and adolescents

How to promote a growth mindset in children and adolescents by Dr. Munn Saechao, Online Therapist for Professional Women of Color and Child & Adolescent Psychotherapist in Mountain View, CA.

There is power in our words. Our words can be both destructive and healing. It’s important that we be thoughtful about how we speak to our children and adolescents.

Can you recall a time during childhood when someone said something hurtful, and when you think about it, negative feelings or self-doubt arise? On the flip side, can you recall a moment when someone said something positive and encouraging and when you think about it, you start to smile? In this same way, consider how your child might be experiencing something similar when you speak words that foster growth versus words that foster self-destruction.

What we take in from our environment during childhood impacts our sense of self perception and how we navigate relationships in the future. I encourage you to put forth a concerted effort to foster a growth mindset in your child. You have the power to help them develop a “growth mindset” and become healthy, thriving adults.

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Webpage: drmunn.com
Email: dr.munn.saechao@gmail.com

Disclaimer: The content in this post is only intended to increase your knowledge on parenting and child development; it is not online therapy. If you’re concerned about your child’s immediate safety please call 911 and consult with a licensed clinician about any clinical symptoms you are observing in your child.

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Growth mindset in children and adolescents

Growth mindset in children and adolescents by Dr. Munn Saechao, Licensed Clinical Social Worker, Child & Adolescent Psychotherapist in Mountain View, CA and Online Parent & Life Coach. 

Carol Dweck, PhD talks about the importance of developing a growth mindset in children and adolescents.

You can cultivate your child’s self-esteem, resilience, and confidence by thoughtfully considering how you praise your child and how you help them to think about their learning. Focus on praising your child’s effort, not fixed traits. Focus on helping them to think about their learning process by connecting their effort and behaviors to their achievement.

Follow/Subscribe to my page to get parenting tips and information about mental health. Feel free to peruse through my social media profiles to learn more about my services.

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Facebook: Dr.Munn
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Email: dr.munn.saechao@gmail.com

Disclaimer: The content in this post is only intended to increase your knowledge on parenting and child development; it is not online therapy. If you’re concerned about your child’s immediate safety please call 911 and consult with a licensed clinician about any clinical symptoms you are observing in your child.